wine wednesday: birthday bubbles

Happy 2017!!! It has been off to a busy start, filled with road trips, a surprise visit from my best friend in New York and of course drinking wine to celebrate.

And since today happens to be my birthday, I figured why not make a fun birthday cocktail!

what you’ll need:

1 bottle of bubbles (mini Moët encouraged)

sprinkles

chocolate chips (semi-sweet or bust!)

2 bowls

1 coup or champagne flute

To make your birthday bubbles, simply add chocolate chips to one bowl and melt your chocolate- I used the microwave heating it in 30 second increments at 50% power until it was melted #burntchocolateistheworst Then, in a separate bowl, pour desired sprinkles. Next, dip coup or flute in chocolate followed by sprinkles. Pop your bubbly and add to festive glass.

Enjoy! And repeat on every birthday (and days you want it to feel like your birthday!)

 

wine wednesday: champagne, france

Break out your bottles of bubbly because IT’S GAME 7 OF THE WORLD SERIES AND I’M SO EXCITED/ANXIOUS/NERVOUS/INTERNET SHOUTING BECAUSE I CAN’T CONTAIN MY EMOTIONS. GO CUBS GO!!!!

Phew…glad I got that out, thank you. It’s been a roller coaster of a ride this season, and you better believe that bottles are going to be popped tonight #FlytheW

Moving back to the topic du jour, Champagne is a region AND a sparkling wine from said region. It was rumored to be created by Monk Dom Pérignon in the 1600s when he added yeast and sugar to his bottle of wine causing a second fermentation in the bottle. Though that’s not 100% true, it’s a fun story to roll out for trivia.

the process

how-champagne-is-made-infographic

As you can see, making one bottle of Champagne is no walk in the park. It’s a labor of love to keep all of the non-vintage (NV) bottles tasting the same year to year. Think about it, isn’t it pretty incredible that all bottles of Veuve Clicquot/Perrier Jouet/Moët et Chandon taste the same year to year???

Champagne houses can also release “vintages” dedicated to a specific year and must be aged a minimum of three years before their release. These are typically nuttier, creamier with notes of honey due to aging. More expensive too!

buying tips

Expect to spend around $40 for your baseline Champagne!

If you are going to buy a vintage of Champagne the years: 1996, 2002, 2004 and 2008 are “good years”

CHAmpagne picks

$$-Moët & Chandon: Available at most grocery stores, you won’t be hard pressed to find a bottle from the largest Champagne house.

$$$-Ruinart: Oldest Champagne house and makes kickass Blanc de Blancs and Rose Champagnes in addition to the traditional stuff.

$$$$-Krug: This is liquid gold, so many different notes in their NV and if I ever get my hands on a “Grand Cuvée” I may or may not share.

GO CUBS!!! Let’s pop some bottles tonight.