wine wednesday: summer sips

Where did this year go?? I mean more than happy to welcome SUMMER but my God! I haven’t even made 4th of July plans yet (better get on that)…speaking of- if you’re doing something rad, I’ll happily provide the party with some fantastic summer-approved sips!

Anyway, besides rosé, you can likely find me sipping on:

summer wine

ORANGE WINE

Like I said, usually a little more full bodied, these wines attain their orange-y hue because the winemakers leave the grape skins in contact with the juice for a limited amount of time (similar to the process of making rosé) They tend to be a little funkier and (in my humble opinion) more fun to sip than your average crisp PG or Sauv B. My favorite right now is THIS BABY (2016 Jolie-Laide Pinot Gris) from a really fun California winemaker!

PÉT NAT aka PETILLANT NATUREL

Hellooooo easy-money-drinking! These effervescent wines go with everything: a tan, the beach, lobsta, sunsets, front porch swings and date nights. Fab on their own too, these are less bubbly than a traditional sparkling wine and are likely unfiltered (it’s ok you’ll live I promise–look at me, I had 2 glasses last night and live to tell the tale!) The rosé versions remind me of a yummy Italian soda, you know those Pelligrino ones? Only there’s alcohol wooohooo. PARTAY. I was drinking THIS or try THIS

CHILLED RED WINE

THIS IS YOUR POWER PLAY!!!! Chill down your Pinot Noirs, Gamays, Grenaches, Sangioveses, Beaujolias..any light-medium bodied red can be served with a chill. Seriously refreshing AF. Perfect with grilled steaks and burgers. I was drinking THIS in my video, how can you say no to that simple label?!

Bottom line is: these are all easy drinking, mood lifting, fun vinos to bring to a BBQ, summer bash or open with friends (or yourself!). Any favorites? Share below in the comments!!

what the hell is a somm(elier)?

24 hours ago, I was holding a glass of champagne at a hotel in Kansas City that I could barely sip. Very unlike me! I was scrolling Instagram trying to distract myself as I waited for my Level One Sommelier test results to be posted. And by posted, I mean my name being read out loud in front of the 70 people who I had just taken this exam with–in alphabetical order! The news of the arrival of Amal Clooney’s twins momentarily distracted me, I even checked in for my flight back to LA, but my mind was still racing.  Bottom line, waiting to hear my name was one of the more nerve-wracking things I’ve gone through in recent memory.

Anyway, during the two day course, I befriended two ladies who were fortunate enough to have last names that fell earlier in the alphabet. After both their names were called (congrats again Tess and Casleah!) they looked back at me and were like:

what’s your last name?

Pelletier.

They were still in the H’s so I had a minute, but dammnnnn my ego almost didn’t want me to say my name out of fear. The P’s arrived and I kid you not it felt like there were 4 “Pa” names. They both turned looking concerned.

it’s Pe” I managed to get out while thinking “it’s ok, you got this, you better get this, f***, f*** F*–“

—“Natalie Pelletier” the Master Sommelier read (pronouncing it the French way I might add!)

Thank GOD! “WOOHOOOOOO” I internally screamed and definitely did a weird shimmy dance to get my certificate and pin. Weight was off my shoulders and you better believe I was able to finish that champ right quick. Level 1 Sommelier Exam passed!

Soooooooo you might be thinking:

Ok Nat, cool (long story) but what the hell is a somm??

Riiiiight. Back to that business.

What is a Sommelier?

A sommelier, if you do a quick Google search, will define it as “a wine steward”. Some of  you might have seen the documentary Somm and think it’s a group of pretentious douche-bags who sit in circles, drink and discuss wine; people who can throw out that “the wine smells like a freshly opened can of tennis balls, grandma’s blueberry cobbler or eucalyptus.” Or maybe you think it’s a person who can do a party-trick of tasting wine and can tell you down to the year and winemaker what they’re drinking. And while I stand by that wine can smell like pie or even weird elements, a sommelier is a person of service. A person to help a guest navigate the wine list, to –in everyday language– describe and bring the guest a bombass wine pairing or new bottle to enhance their dining experience.

Simply, a sommelier is a service based beverage specialist, a “Siri/Alexa/Ok Google” source to deliver the best sips to YOU.

tess, casleah et moi!

There are levels too!

In the Court of Master Sommeliers there are 4 levels:

  1. Intro Sommelier
  2. Certified Sommelier
  3. Advanced Sommelier
  4. Master Sommelier

The level I just passed, Intro, involved a 2 day course before the exam. To say my brain was fried after the exam is very accurate. I don’t think I’ve ever received so much information within a 48-hour period. I also tried 24 fantastic wines “blind**” (spit most of it to help with info retention) to get my palate trained to know the difference between say a standard NZ Sauv Blanc and Loire Valley Sauv B.

**when I say “blind” I mean that I didn’t see the wine poured from the bottle. I wasn’t blindfolded, as seeing the color of the wine is a key indicator to help deduce the varietal.

Going in I knew a good deal, but there was plenty of newness thrown my way. Yes, I had the course book available to me from the moment I signed up, but did I look through it that much beforehand? Notttt really. I had planned on doing that two weeks leading up, but I booked a feature film (yayyy, more on that later this week!) so I was working on my script and not wine.

Anywhooooo, I digress.

I also really wanted to take this couch back to LA

Why I took it.

You know these wine videos I’m making? Well I decided it was time to get legit! I want to be a better teacher, so gotta go through the motions. Wine is something I find fascinating and like learning about, a hobby if you will. So, my plan is to study more, and continue on to level two so I’m “officially certified”. Of course I’ll keep the videos coming (potentially turn it into a show…) who knows! Knowledge is Power!!

Are you going to quit acting?

NOOOOO. Not at all. I’ve always aimed to live a full life; to pursue interests in conjunction with work. So educating myself in the beverage world is only enhancing how I’ve chosen to live.

Why did you take it in Kansas City?

The Level One classes were all full in the Southern California area for the rest of the year, so I decided to head out to the Midwest and visit a place I called home for 3 years. Shout out to my childhood bestie/friend from camp/family friends for taking me in and being THE BEST hosts. Katie, I will be sore for days from your spin/barre classes, thank you! (KC peeps go take her classes at Mojo and Bar Method!)

If you’re still reading…

That’s about all I got folks. I am so thrilled that I passed, but now your girl’s got a lot more learning to do in between acting gigs.

As always, cheers! And if you can get your hands on a glass or bottle of Austrian Strohmeier Schilcher Pet Nat buy it! It’s a tart sparkling rosé that reminds me of the soda Squirt- you’ll get those good grapefruit notes, but also sour cherry. It’s dry as hell and super refreshing!! Like a tart version of a good Italian soda.

 

 

frosé all day

 

It’s that time of year…the weather’s starting to heat up, summer is almost here, and frozen cocktails are on the brain. Or maybe it’s just that it feels necessary to celebrate the gorgeous weather and everyone’s sun-kissed/freckled skin.

Frosé crept into the scene last year and with the some recipe testing, I’ll let you know it’s very easy to make at home!

This is for the hot days, where you want to add ice cubes to your wine, or blend up a batch for a BBQ, book club, or just because. I promise the added sugar doesn’t make it sweet at all. It’s needed to balance out the tart lemon and blended wine.

FROSÉ (serves 5)

  • 1 bottle rosé
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 cup cut strawberries
  • approx. 2 lemons

Using a large freezer zip-top bag, pour entire bottle of wine into bag.  Seal bag and press extra air out (don’t want it to balloon in the freezer). **Freeze for 12 hours**

**note that this step can be omitted. When I first read a frosé recipe I skimmed over it like an idiot so when I made this video I didn’t have the 12 hour frozen bag in place.

Anyway….To make the strawberry simple syrup you’ll need to: first, cut up 1 cup of strawberries, slice, dice, whatever you want and set aside. Next, add 1/2 cup boiling water to 1/2 cup of sugar. Mix until sugar is dissolved. Place cut berries into warm sugar water and set aside to cool for about 15 minutes.

In the meantime, juice enough lemons to get yourself 2oz worth.

Set up your blender. Now, if you haven’t frozen your rosé for 12 hours, add about a tray worth of ice cubes as the base (simply omit this step if your rosé is in a semi-frozen state).

Add frozen rosé, simple syrup, strawberries and 20z lemon juice to the blender.

Start up that blender and let it whirl until frothy.

Garnish with a berry, drink, dance and be merry!

(repeat when necessary) 

PS: the wine glass I used can be found HERE 

where to find rosé

Almost like an add on to the last rosé post, because the wine is made from all different grape varietals, it can come from anywhere wine is produced. Yes Provence is reigning Queen, but there are many different wine regions that are producing something in that vein but with their own twist. Dare I say a new place will take over Provence’s rule??

What I’m aiming at, is other rosés deserve recognition. You don’t have to go Provence or bust- there are plenty of other dry, mineral forward, crisp, hint of fruit (strawberry, raspberry, white peach, etc.), delicious choices out there!

yes way rosé

And I have two in mind that you should try:

La Spinetta Casanova Rosé

the palest of pinks, this one is a true crowdpleaser from one of Italy’s best and renowned winemakers!

Arnot-Roberts Rosé

super dry and perfect for the beach, this California rosé stands up to the best of the South of France!

 

CHEERS!!!

 

how rosé is made

Like I mentioned in the video, there are four ways to produce rosé wine.

At the end of the day, what gives wine its color is THE GRAPE SKINS. And that’s why each different grape varietal produces wines with a different hue. Next time you’re out, get one glass of Pinot Noir and let’s say one glass of Cabernet Sauvignon- you’ll be able to tell right away that Pinot Noir grapes produce a lighter colored vino. Different varietal leads to different hue.

The same holds true for rosé. Red grape varietals are used to make rosé only there are 4 methods to produce the pink drink.

how rose wine is made
image via

BLENDING

This method is typical for the production of sparkling rosé especially in the Champagne region of France. Elsewhere, it’s frowned upon to make rosé in this style. A lot of countries in Europe actually ban this process, but there are low quality still rosés that are made from blending red and white wine. So to recap: high quality sparkling rosé is made from adding a little red wine to bubbly AND $*!tty/cheap rosés are made from a mix of white and red wine.

DIRECT PRESS

Direct press typically leads to the lightest colored rosés in the game. The wine only sees skin contact for a short amount of time, just when the vintner is squeezing aka pressing the grapes to make the pre-alcoholic wine juice. It is verrryyy similar to the third method, limited skin maceration, however, this method doesn’t involve letting the grape skins sit with the wine.

LIMITED SKIN MACERATION aka LIMITED SKIN CONTACT

As you can see in the lovely graphic, the longer the red grape skins sit with the juice, the darker the pink becomes. Macerating the skins also imbues the wine with a bit more structure and aromatics. So pending the amount of time the skins sit, this method can create anything from light blush rosé to a deeper full bodied rosé.

SAIGNÉE

Which means in French “bleeding” actually creates a rosé and a red wine. I used Pinot Noir as my example in the video, so again a winemaker takes pinot noir juice and then portions off a certain amount from the first time pressing the grapes. That portioned off juice is the rosé! It is a pink color because the small selection that is run off only has a short amount of time with the grape skins. We can also call this kind of rosé a byproduct because at the end of the day, more red wine is created.

See you next week where I’ll take you through a recipe to make FROSÉ, just in time for Memorial Day Weekend.

CHEERS!